With millions of dollars in transactions, my Commercial Division has been a proven member of the Denver's Real Estate community since 2010.   My expertise applies to all types of transactions, from purchases to sales to leasing.  I'm a specialist in multi-family, retail, office, land, industrial, and business real estate - the right fit for your commercial real estate needs.

What Is a “Commercial Property?”

Commercial properties may refer to:

● Retail Buildings

● Office Buildings

● Warehouses

● Industrial Buildings

● Apartment Buildings

● “Mixed use” buildings, where the property may have a mix, such as retail, office and apartments.

Thanks to my local presence and growth in the Denver market, I gather data allowing us to produce renowned studies as well as anticipating shifts and tendencies within the commercial market.

My business is built on trust and integrity. This is intrinsic in everything I do, and is what gives my clients, colleagues, suppliers, partners and investors the confidence to work with me. I treat everyone individually, offering advice, which in turn builds long-term relationships and helps you make better property decisions.



COMMERCIAL ADVISOR

Unlike a traditional real estate agent, I provide clients with value-added services, including asset management, market analysis, and lease management.


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Working as a team, I will find you the perfect investment and match you with adequate financing, negotiate the contract and close the deal. It's truly a partnership.


(303) 868-0011

PROS

The best reason to invest in commercial over residential rentals is the earning potential. Commercial properties generally have an annual return off the purchase price between 6% and 12%, depending on the area, which is a much higher range than typically exists for single family home properties (1% to 4% at best).

Small business owners generally take pride in their businesses and want to protect their livelihood. Owners of commercial properties are usually not individuals, but LLCs, and operate the property as a business. As such, the landlord and tenant have more of a business-to-business customer relationship, which helps keep interactions professional and courteous.

Retail tenants have a vested interest in maintaining their store and storefront, because if they don’t, it will affect their business. As a result, commercial tenants and property owner interests are aligned, which helps the owner maintain and improve the quality of the property, and ultimately, the value of their investment.

Businesses usually go home at night. In other words, you work when they work. Barring emergency calls at night for break-ins or fire alarms, you should be able to rest at night without having to worry about receiving a midnight call because a tenant wants repairs or has lost a key. For commercial properties it is also more likely you will have an alarm monitoring service so that if anything does happen at night, your alarm company will notify the proper authorities.

It's often easier to evaluate the property prices of commercial property because you can request the current owner’s income statement and determine what the price should be based on that. If the seller is using a knowledgeable broker, the asking price should be set at a price where an investor can earn the area’s prevailing cap rate for the commercial property type they are looking at (retail, office, industrial, etc.). Residential properties are often subject to more emotional pricing.

There are variations to triple net leases, but the general concept is that you as the property owner do not have to pay any expenses on the property (as would be the case with residential real estate). The lessee handles all property expenses directly, including real estate taxes. The only expense you’ll have to pay is your mortgage. Companies like Walgreens, CVS, and Starbucks typically sign these types of leases, as they want to maintain a look and feel in keeping with their brand, so they manage those costs, and you as an investor get to have one of the lowest maintenance income producers for your money. Strip malls have a variety of net leases and triple nets are not usually done with smaller businesses, but these lease types are optimal and you can’t get them with residential properties.

CONS

If you own a commercial retail building with five tenants, or even just a few, you have more to manage than you do with a residential investment. You can’t be an absentee landlord and maximize the return on your investment. With commercial, you are likely dealing with multiple leases, annual CAM adjustments (Common Area Maintenance costs that tenants are responsible for), more maintenance issues, and public safety concerns. In a nutshell, you have more to manage; and just as your tenants have to worry about the public eye, you do as well.

If you are a do-it-yourselfer, you better be licensed if you are going to handle the maintenance issues at a commercial property. The likelihood is you will not be prepared to handle maintenance issues yourself and you will need to hire someone to help with emergencies and repairs. While this added cost isn’t ideal, you’ll need to add it on to your set of expenses in order to properly care for the property. Remember to factor in property management expenses when evaluating the price to pay for a commercial investment property. Property management companies can charge between 5-10% of rent revenues for their services, which include lease administration. Evaluate beforehand if you want to manage leasing and the relationships yourself, or if you want to outsource those responsibilities.

Acquiring a commercial property typically requires more capital up front than acquiring a residential rental in the same area, so it’s often more difficult to get your foot in the door. Once you’ve acquired a commercial property, you can expect some large capital expenditures to follow. Your property might be humming along for a few months and wham, here comes a $10,000 bill to address roofing repairs or a new furnace. With more customers there are more facilities to maintain and therefore more costs. What you hope is that the gains in revenue outweigh the gains in costs, to support purchasing a commercial property over a residential one.

Properties intended for commercial use have more public visitors and therefore have more people on the property each day that can get hurt or do something to damage your property. Cars can hit patrons in parking lots, people can slip on ice during the winter, and vandals can spray paint the sides of the building. Incidents like these can occur anywhere, but chances of experiencing something like these events go up when investing in commercial properties. If you're risk adverse, you may want to look more closely at putting your money in residential properties.



YOUR COMMERCIAL PROPERTY AWAITS


Call: (303) 455-5500